Biological Sciences Courses

01:119:117 BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

 

Biological Research Laboratory 01:119:117 (BRL117) is the laboratory component of the first year life science course required of all Life Science majors. It is appropriate for students who plan on attending a graduate or professional school in the life or health sciences. 

This is a CORE course required of all life science majors.

Offered

Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

2

Prerequisites

The first semester of General Biology, 119:115 or 119:101, is a required prerequisite for the lab. It is highly recommended to be co-registered with General Biology, 119:116 while taking BRL117. Students may take the lab after completing the two General Biology courses (119:115 and 119:116).

Course Description

In Biological Research Laboratory, students conduct research in two conceptual area, aquatic ecology and DNA seq.   Students design and conduct a novel research project in aquatic ecology. Students also isolate and sequence DNA from an organism they collect on a field trip to a local water body. The two research projects are linked ultimately via phylogenetics.  Through these projects, students are exposed to the process of science and tools and techniques used in science.

Course URL

A Sakai site will be available to students.

Course Satisfies Departmental Learning Goals

I. To acquire the appropriate factual and conceptual knowledge that provides students with a foundation to further their education and career in the areas of life science or health science.  Students will be able to demonstrate basic knowledge (ex. identify, define, explain...) of the concepts, practices and principles that comprise the biological sciences.

II. To develop data analysis and statistical reasoning skills that prepares students for a society increasing reliant on the use of data and information. Students will be able to interpret/evaluate patterns in data presented in tables, figures, and graphs as well as be able to organize, summarize and present data.

III. To develop the ability to use scientific reasoning as embodied by the structured process commonly known as the scientific method to empower students with the ability to generate and refine knowledge. Students will be able to evaluate and apply the practice of science.

IV. To develop critical thinking and problems solving skills appropriate to prepare students to evaluate, synthesize and generate knowledge that provides them with a competitive advantage to adapt to an evolving, global, and knowledge based society.  Students will be able to demonstrate application of higher order thinking (ex. classify, diagnosis, evaluate, synthesize, hypothesize...).  Students will develop an understanding of not only the connections within biology but also the connections between biology and other scientific disciplines.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

               Midterm Exam                      15 %
               Final Exam                           15%
               Assignments                         25%
               Capstone Project                   30%
                Lab Work                             10%
                Deportment                           5%
                Total                                   100%

 The Capstone Project is a multi-week research project that will be completed in groups and will include a written report and a group presentation. The project requires students to  develop and test a hypothesis and report on the findings. More information will be provided during the semester.

Course Materials

1. Textbook: Campbell Biology, 10th Ed, 2014  Reece et al. Benjamin Cummings, 1488 pp. ISBN-13: 9780321775658).

2.  A Short Guide to Writing about Biology, 9th Ed, 2015.  Pechenik, J.  Pearson.  Bound or binder version.

3.  The laboratory manual will be provided to students.

4.  Clicker for lecture:  Turning Technology ResponseCard NXT clickers (recommended version).

Course closed?

No special permission numbers or wait lists are available for Biological Research Laboratory. If the course is closed, please continue to look for openings up through the end of the add drop period in the beginning of the semester. The lab may be taken after General Biology 116. Wait list offered during summer session.

Faculty

Dr. Monica Torres

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

This course is intended for non-science majors. It can be used to meet the new SAS Core Curriculum goals in 21st Century Challenges [21C] and Natural Sciences [NS].

This course CANNOT be used to fulfill the requirements of the Biological Sciences major or the Genetics major. Offered: Fall

Credits :4

Prerequisites: none

Course Description

Why do humans get sick? Why are diabetes and obesity on the rise? Why have cancer and cardiovascular diseases become so prevalent? Is there a mismatch between the environments in which we evolved and environments in which we now live? Why did cholera, measles, mumps, whooping cough, and malaria become epidemic diseases? Why has evolution failed to make us immune to disease? Based in cutting-edge genetic and evolutionary biology research conducted at Rutgers, “Genetics, Evolution, and Human Health” explores what science can tell us about what it means to be human and why humans get sick. How can genetics be used and misused? What social, political, environmental, and medical changes would be required to improve human health in the 21st century?

Topics include:

Human evolution and migration, adaption to changing environments, why evolution  made us vulnerable to diseases such as diabetes, and cancer, coevolution with other plants and animals. misuse of genetics (eugenics
Course URL

Sakai

Description here. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvbAc1_M0xQ

Course Learning Goals

At the end of this course students will be able to discuss (with evidence) the following topics. In addition they will be able to discuss how science can be used to help deal with social issues.

1.         What does it mean to be human from  Genetic and Evolutionary Biology points of view.  This will include the evidence that all extant humans are members of a single species (Homo sapiens ) sharing common traits.

2.         That the environment in which we live is not the environment in which we evolved.  That is means that there is an environmental  mismatch, That is, our bodies were shaped for environments far different from those we live in, and this mismatch gives rise to much disease.

3.         That any individual will be more or less vulnerable to diseasesGenetics and Evolution can provide clues as to why disease happens.

4.         That human evolution is due to a great part to technological intervention.  Technological intervention can be both positive and negative. The masteries of fire and cooking were conditions that changed future evolution. (Smaller guts, larger brains smaller jaws and reduced tooth size). The invention of agriculture allowed population growth but also allowed many diseases (cholera, measles, mumps, whooping coughs, malaria) to become epidemic.

5.         That humans coevolved with many other organisms and in certain environments.   We have 300 to 1000 species of bacteria in our intestines a that are vital to our health.  We ingest or smell plants that provide important component including regulating our moods.  John Donne’s quote “No man is an island, entire of itself”should be more widely cast as no Species is an Island entire of itself.  Leaving our partners behind as we move to urbanized environments can be detrimental to our health.

6.         That genetic and evolutionary advances, like any scientific advance,  can be positive or negative. For example, Misunderstanding of the nature of genetic differences contributed to the eugenics movements that occurred throughout the 2oth century (and have never really gone away) .

SAS Learning Goals

21st Century Challenges [21C] and Natural Sciences [NS].

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Weekly quizzes & reflective writing, recitations including written assignments, course project, final exam.

Course Materials

Required Texts:

Spencer Wells. The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey  ISBN: 0-8129-7145-9 (Paperback)

Rob Dunn.    The Wild Life of our BodiesISBN: 978-0-06-180648-3

Course Closed?

If the course is closed there are no special permission numbers.  The stop point is the right at the number of seats in the room.

Faculty

Dr. Terry McGuire

Nelson Biol Labs B420

Contact by email only please - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator

Research in Biology 119:307, 308, 406, 407


These courses are open to Biological Sciences majors and minors who want to extend their learning experience by participating in a scientific research project.  Research experience is recommended for all students intending to pursue post-graduate studies.

Upon approval, up to 6 credits total of Independent Study in Biology, Research in Biology, and Honors in Biology courses may be used towards fulfillment of the Biological Sciences elective requirement.

119:307 or higher may be used towards fulfilling only one of the Biological Sciences laboratory requirements  (three labs total are required for the major).


 Offered

Fall, Spring, and Summer

Credits

1- 4  per semester by permission of the Director of Advising (4-5 hours of work per week per credit required).

Prerequisites

Open only to Biological Sciences majors and minors or by special permission. Minimum cumulative GPA or  2.8 required.

In order to register for research in Biological Sciences, students must submit 1) a one page research proposal and 2) a research application signed by the student's research mentor. The proposal must include: necessary background material, a specific hypothesis to be tested, a description of the data that the student will collect,  and expected results.

Course Description

Research in Biology is intended to provide students with an opportunity to experience the scientific discovery process. Students engage in laboratory and/or field experimentation under the direct supervision of a faculty mentor. Each student is expected to carry out his/her own research project. "Hands-on" laboratory exposure is an essential component of this course.

Course Research Contract and Information:

Research in Biology Contract

http://biology.rutgers.edu/biological-sciences/research

Course Syllabus

Research in Biology Syllabus 2018

Course Satisfies Departmental Learning Goals

3. To understand and develop an appreciation for research as the basis of scientific study.

4. To understand and to appreciate the process of science. To acquire the ability to use scientific reasoning as embodied by the structured process commonly known as the scientific method.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

A written research paper in the format of a paper submitted to a leading journal in the field is required at the end of each registration period. The research paper should include an Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results (data should be presented in figure and/or tabular form), Discussion and References. A minimum of 10 pages is required. The research summary must be graded by the faculty mentor prior to submission to the Director of Advising.

Faculty

Course Coordinator:

Dr. Anne Carr-Schmid

Director of Advising, Biological Sciences
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

 

Independent Study in Biology 01:119:201, 202


These courses are open to Biological Sciences majors and minors who want to extend their learning experience by completing an in-depth library research project (119:201, 202).

Upon approval, up to 6 credits of Independent Study and Research in Biology and Honors in Biology courses may be used towards fulfillment of the Biological Sciences elective requirement.


Offered

Fall, Spring, and Summer

Credits

1- 3 per semester by permission of the Office of Undergraduate Instruction ( 10 pages per credit).

Prerequisites

Open only to Biological Sciences majors and minors. Minimum GPA = 2.8 required..

Course Description

Independent Study in Biology(119:201/202) is intended to augment the curriculum by giving students an opportunity to expand their studies into areas not specifically addressed by the formal course offerings. Students work under the direct supervision of a faculty mentor to delve into a subject of mutual interest.

Course Application and Information:

Independent Study Contract

http://biology.rutgers.edu/biological-sciences/research

 Course Syllabus:

Independent Study in Biology Syllabus 2018

Course Satisfies Departmental Learning Goals

119:201,202: To understand and to appreciate the process of science. To acquire the ability to use scientific reasoning as embodied by the structured process commonly known as the scientific method.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Independent Study in Biology: A term paper in appropriate scientific format, including a full bibliography (citing peer-reviewed primary and secondary sources) is due at the end of the registration period. The term paper should be at least 10 pages per registered credit and must be graded by the faculty advisor prior to submission to the Director of Advising.

 

Faculty

Course Coordinator:

Dr. Anne Carr-Schmid

Director of Advisng, Biological Sciences
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

Honors in Biology 01:119:408, 409


These courses are open to Biological Sciences majors and minors who want to extend their learning experience by participating in a scientific research project.  Research experience is recommended for all students intending to pursue post-graduate studies.

Upon approval, up to 6 credits of Independent Study in Biology, Research in Biology, and Honors in Biology courses may be used towards fulfillment of the Biological Sciences elective requirement.

119:408 or higher may be used towards fulfilling only one of the Biological Sciences laboratory requirements  (three labs total are required for the major).   


Offered

Fall, Spring, and Summer

Credits

1- 6 by permission of the Director of Undergraduate Instruction (4-5 hours of work per week per credit).

Prerequisites

Open only to Biological Sciences majors. ..

Honors in Biology is open only to Seniors majoring in Biological Sciences with a major GPA of 3.4 or higher and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher with previous research experience. Registration for Honors in Biology qualifies a student for graduation with Departmental Honors. Please note that Departmental Honors is a separate distinction from SAS or SEBS School honors programs.

Course Description

Honors in Biology  is intended to provide highly motivated students with an opportunity to immerse themselves in a scientific research project. Students engage in laboratory and/or field experimentation under the direct supervision of a faculty mentor. Each student is expected to complete his/her own original research project. "Hands-on" laboratory exposure is an essential component of this course. Honors in Biology projects are expected to be more sophisticated than Research in Biology projects and must be accompanied by an Honors Thesis and Oral Thesis defense.

Course Contract and Information:

Honors in Biology Research Contract

http://biology.rutgers.edu/biological-sciences/research

Course Syllabus

 Honors in Biology Syllabus 2018

Course Satisfies Departmental Learning Goals

3. To understand and develop an appreciation for research as the basis of scientific study.

4. To understand and to appreciate the process of science. To acquire the ability to use scientific reasoning as embodied by the structured process commonly known as the scientific method.

 Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Students must complete a minimum of 6 credits to qualify for Departmental Honors (3 fall/ 3 spring). Students must submit a 10 page progress report at the end of the first semester and a written thesis accompanied by an oral presentation and thesis-defense in the second semester. The thesis committee must be composed of at least three faculty members, including the research advisor and at least one member of the SAS Division of Life Sciences faculty.

 

Faculty

Course Coordinator:

Dr. Anne Carr-Schmid

Director of Advising, Biological Sciences
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.