Biological Sciences Courses

01:119:155 HUMAN GENETICS

 

This course is intended for non-science majors.

This course CANNOT be used to fulfill the requirements of the Biological Sciences major.


Offered

Spring, Summer


Credits

3

Prerequisites

None


Course Description

This online class introduces the student to Human Genetics, from the micro level to the macro level. We will begin by covering some of the foundational molecular biology, such as the structure of DNA and the means by which your genes influence your development and health. We will also discuss genetics at the family level, and study the patterns of disease inheritance we see in families that have a disease-causing mutation running through them. We will then discuss a number of topics related to how we use our knowledge of genetics to tailor medical treatments to specific patient's needs, use stem cell therapies for specific diseases, and help infertile couples have children. All the cellular, molecular, and biotechnological materials is presented in a manner that assumes the student has no background in biology.

Course URL                                                                                                                                      

A Sakai site will be available at the beginning of the semester

Course Satisfies SAS Core Learning Goals

  • 21st Century (21C): Analyze the relationship that science and technology have to a contemporary social issue.
  • Natural Science (NS): Understand and apply basic principles and concepts in the physical or biological sciences.
  • Natural Science (NS): Identify and critically assess ethical and societal issues in science.

Course Satisfies Learning Goals

  • To understand and develop an appreciation for research as the basis of scientific study
  • To understand and to appreciate the process of science
  • To acquire the ability to use scientific reasoning
  • To understand biology as a framework of related concepts

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Grades will be derived from a combination of three exams and regular homework assignments.

Course Materials

No Required Textbook

Course Closed?

If this course is closed, please use the following link to add your name to the wait list: Wait List Sign Up for Spring 2018 Courses . If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences -Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or visit our office at  Nelson Biological Laboratories  B112, Busch Campus.


Faculty
Dr. R. Michaelis


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

01:146:310 PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION: HEART, STRESS, AND EXERCISE

 

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.

This course is designed for Honors Students with an interest in the subject. For students who are not in the SAS Honors program, please contact the Division of Life Sciences - Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Offered

Fall and Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

01:119:115-116

Course Description

This course will focus on the cardiovascular function and its response to stress, exercise and gender. Initially we will discuss the body's ability to adjust and adapt to internal and external environmental challenges. We will examine when the body was first analyzed as a whole system; a system that interacts and maintains its functional integrity even when it is submitted to disturbances. We will consider the body view of the early 1900's as well our present day understanding and the remarkable contributions of eminent scientists. The cardiovascular system plays an important role in providing oxygen and nutrients for the human body (and mammals in general). Under physiological conditions, the heart beats without fatiguing throughout life. When there is a need, the heart speeds up accordingly to keep up with oxygen and nutrients body demands. However, during calm conditions the heart slows down to economize energy. Intricate physiological mechanisms underlie these conditions. We will consider the gender differences in the cardiovascular responses to exercise and stress.  Physical and mental stressors induce both short- term adjustments and long- term body adaptations.  The interrelation between exercising, relaxation and cardiovascular health will be examined. Finally, significant findings on the mindfulness meditation and its effects on the cardiovascular health and stress will be reviewed.

Course URL

On Sakai Rutgers portal and it will be available on the first day of classes.

https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal

 Course Satisfies Learning Goals

The goal of this course is to develop the student's knowledge and understanding of how the heart and vasculature respond to stress and exercise. The students should understand the body as a whole integrative system. Students should be able to identify the physiological mechanisms of heart adjust (short-term) and adaptation (long-term). It is expected that the students understand the unique role of heart and vasculature in maintaining homeostasis under an increase environmental demand and/ or internal body inputs. It is expected that they will recognize and will acquire some understanding about the heart view in the past and now days. Recognize the gender differences in the cardiovascular physiology, exercise and stress responses. Students should comprehend the scientific basis of interventions (exercise, physical training, meditation) to improve cardiovascular health and stress reduction.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Course grade will be based on classroom participation (20%), reading assignments 30%; oral presentation of student’s project (20%), followed by a hand-written version of the presentation (20-25 pages; 30%). Total 100%.

Course Materials

Lovallo, W.R. Stress and Health: Biological and Psychological Interactions, 3rd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA:

Sage Publications: 2016. 329 p.  ISBN:978-1-4833-4744-8.

Articles, book chapters, and videos will be announced in class.

Course Closed?

If this course is closed, please use the following link to add your name to the wait list: Wait List Sign Up for Fall 2018 Courses . If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences - Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or visit our office at Nelson Biological Laboratories B112, Busch Campus.

Faculty

Dr. Roseli Golfetti
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This course is intended for non-science majors.

This course can be used to meet the new SAS Core Curriculum goal in Natural Sciences

This course CANNOT be used to fulfill the requirements of the Biological Sciences major or the Cell Biology & Neurosciences major.

This course is not offered Spring 2017

Offered

Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

None

Course Description

The effects of drugs on the human body from a biological perspective.

Topics include:

1. Drug use in society

2. How drugs work

3. Effects of specific drugs including:

        -Stimulants

        -Depressants

        -Medications for psychiatric disorders

        -Alcohol

       -Tobacco

       -Caffeine

       -Opiods

       -Hallucinogens

       -Marijuana

                    

Course URL

Sakai

Course Satisfies SAS Core Curriculum Learning Goals

1. Natural Sciences (NS): Understand and apply basic principles and concepts in the physical or biological sciences.

2. Natural Sciences(NS): Identify and critically assess ethical and societal issues in science.

Course Satisfies Learning Goals

1. Students are expected to develop academic skills that will provide a foundation for life-long learning.  

2. To understand and to appreciate the process of science. To acquire the ability to use scientific reasoning as embodied by the structured process commonly known as the scientific method.

3. Students are expected to learn basic terms, concepts and theories in pharmacology.

4. Students are expected to apply those terms, theories and concepts of social, ethical and legal issues of human use of prescribed drugs and drugs used for recreational purposes.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Weekly quizzes and three multiple choice exams

Course Materials

Required Text:

Drugs, Society, and Human Behavior (15th edition), Hart & Ksir,  2013   ISBN-0073529745

Course Closed?

 If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences -Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or visit our office at Nelson Biological Laboratories B112, Busch Campus.

Faculty

Dr. Sidney B. Auerbach
Phone: (732) 445-3441
 


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 01:119:182 ESSENTIALS OF HUMAN REPRODUCTION

 

This course may NOT be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.

Offered

Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

None

Course Description

Anatomical and physiological bases of human sexuality; biological and cultural aspects of sexual differentiation and psychosexual development, contraception, venereal disease, and sexual lifestyles.

  Topics include:

  Biological background

  Spermatogenesis

  Oogenesis

  Menstrual cycle

  Conception

  Pregnancy

  Male development

  Female development

  Sexual response

  Fertility management

  Sexually transmitted Disease

  HIV and AIDS

  Sexual dysfunction

  Studying sexual behavior

  Sexuality

  Social Issues

Course Syllabi

Course Syllabus Spring 2017

Course URL

http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~uzwiak/

Course Satisfies SAS Core Curriculum Learning Goals

 1.Natural Sciences (NS): Understand and apply basic principles and concepts in the physical or biological sciences.

2. Natural Sciences (NS): Explain and be able to assess the relationship among assumptions, method, evidence, arguments, and theory in scientific analysis.

Course Satisfies Learning Goals

1. To develop academic skills that will provide a foundation for success in advanced courses, gate-keeper standardized tests, graduate or professional school, and life-long learning.

2. To acquire the appropriate factual and conceptual knowledge that provides student with a foundation on which they can further their immediate education and to manage a career.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Your final grade will reflect collective performance during the entire semester. There are a total of 400 points (see below for breakdown). Hourly exams will comprise 50% of the final grade. There will be three hourly exams with the lowest score dropped. The final exam will be cumulative and comprise the remaining 50% of the final grade. The hourly and final exams will be comprised of multiple choice questions.

                                   Points

Hourly Exams (2/3)        200

Final Exam                   200

Total for Course             400

Extra Credit:  None

Scaling:  Grades are scaled based on the relative performance of students to each other.

Course Materials

Text:  Human Reproductive Biology

Course Closed?

If this course is closed, please use the following link to add your name to the wait list:Wait List Sign Up for Spring 2018 Courses . If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences - Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or visit our office at Nelson Biological Laboratories B112, Busch Campus.

Faculty

Course Coordinator:
Dr. Anthony Uzwiak
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

01:119:195 BRAIN, MIND, AND BEHAVIOR

 

This course is only open to students in the honors program.

This course may not be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.

This course is not intended for students who have already taken Fundamentals of Neurobiology, Essentials of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Physiological Psychology or Neuropsychology.

Offered

Fall and Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

None

Course Description

The course will be organized around a number of case stories in the fields of neurology and neuroscience. Several of the case stories are written by V.S. Ramachandran and Oliver Sacks. They both write about patients with neurological deficits in a way that is captivating and fascinating for lay people, but also with enough detail and explanation of the underlying brain mechanisms to be useful as a first view into neuroscience. Articles by other authors from magazines such as The New Yorker, New York Times Magazine and Scientific American will also be used in the course. The course is aimed at honors students with an interest in the brain, but with no prior knowledge of neuroscience. Both science and non-science majors are welcome.

Course Satisfies Departmental Learning Goal(s)

 I. To acquire the appropriate factual and conceptual knowledge that provides students with a foundation to further their education and career in the areas of life science or health science.  Students will be able to demonstrate basic knowledge (ex. identify, define, explain...) of the concepts, practices and principles that comprise the biological sciences.

II. To develop data analysis and statistical reasoning skills that prepares students for a society increasing reliant on the use of data and information. Students will be able to interpret/evaluate patterns in data presented in tables, figures, and graphs as well as be able to organize, summarize and present data.

III. To develop the ability to use scientific reasoning as embodied by the structured process commonly known as the scientific method to empower students with the ability to generate and refine knowledge. Students will be able to evaluate and apply the practice of science.

IV. To develop critical thinking and problems solving skills appropriate to prepare students to evaluate, synthesize and generate knowledge that provides them with a competitive advantage to adapt to an evolving, global, and knowledge based society.  Students will be able to demonstrate application of higher order thinking (ex. classify, diagnosis, evaluate, synthesize, hypothesize...).  Students will develop an understanding of not only the connections within biology but also the connections between biology and other scientific disciplines.

Course URL

Sakai

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

The final grade in the course will be based on a midterm exam, a final exam, reading responses, quizzes and class attendance.

Course Materials

The Tell-Tale Brain, by V.S. Ramachandran (ISBN: 9780393340624) - required

An Anthropologist on Mars, by Oliver Sacks (ISBN: 9780679756972) - required

Course Closed?

If this course is closed, please use the following link to add your name to the wait list: Wait List Sign Up for Fall 2018 Courses .  If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences - Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075, or visit our office at Nelson Biological Laboratories, B112,Busch Campus.

Faculty

Dr. J Schjott

** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.